What is Root and Unlock?

Discussion in 'Smartphone' started by Stewie, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. Stewie

    Stewie United States Tron- Lives

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    What is root?
    Root is getting root access to your smartphone. Many apps require it, and when you do root your smartphone, you can do so much more stuff. Like, set up a firewall so you can block apps from using 3G/4G LTE or Wifi, or block it from using data at all. Also, it is 100% legal.

    Does root break my phone?

    I don't understand why people believe it does, but it does not. There is a 0.001% it does, and that is because they end up doing something they shouldn't.

    Does root void my warranty?
    You may want to contact your provider for this. In most cases, it does. I know Verizon does. But, for other carriers, it may not. So, before you proceed anymore with thread, you should consult your carrier if it will void your warranty. If something does happen to your phone, then un-root it and they won't know that it's been rooted.


    What is unlocking?

    Unlocking your phone is unlocking its bootloader. By default, it's locked. But, there is a way to unlock it's bootloader.

    When your bootloader, you can flash modified themes, flash unofficial ROMs, like CM7, CM9 and MIUI. Now, no matter what carrier you have, unlocking it will have your warranty voided. I know that for a fact. There may be one or two that allow you. This is also 100 legal. unlike jailbreaking.

    Does unlocking my phone break it?


    No. But again, there is that 0.001% that it can break your phone. And that only happens when you do something, you shouldn't have. Like, flash a ROM that isn't compatible with the version your phone is, or get it stuck in a bootloop. Trust me, from personal experience, you do not want to fuck up your phone.

    Is unlocking it free?

    On most phones, it is. There are a few, like mine, that cost money.

    Does unlocking void my warranty?

    It might, depending on your carrier. Again, if something does happen to your phone, you will have to relock the bootloader, and they won't know that it's been unlocked.

    If you have any questions related to unlocking or rooting your phone, PM me. I will answer any and all questions you have.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012

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  2. AirGK

    AirGK United States Renown Hacker

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    Actually if you do root your phone, you are still able to get your warrenty. All you really have to do is just unroot your phone and they wont notice a thing. Also if your phone somehow your phone is messed up and are unable to accesing anything on your phone and you return it for a warrenty, they are unable to find out your phone is rooted or not. In most cases im talking about a "bricked" phone.

    Also Jailbreaking is 100% legal too.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2012
  3. Stewie

    Stewie United States Tron- Lives

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    I thought jailbreak was illegal.
    Also, I know that if you unroot it, they won't notice it. Forgot to add that in.
     
  4. AirGK

    AirGK United States Renown Hacker

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    Yup, jailbreaking is fully legal to do. Just maybe what you do after is not, like installous. It was announced last year and was put in the exemption list of the DMCA.
     
  5. EliteVirtuoso

    EliteVirtuoso Fanatic Hacker

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    Jailbreaking is Legal to the point you use cracked software as Air GK said
     
  6. Stewie

    Stewie United States Tron- Lives

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    /Closed
    If you want to continue this, go to the main android section.
     
  7. Stewie

    Stewie United States Tron- Lives

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    /Re-opened for questions.

    Also, fixed various stuff like in my other thread.
     

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