Where/How to learn coding/programming

Discussion in 'Programming & Reversing Discussion' started by SoraAmm1, Jun 4, 2015.

Discuss Where/How to learn coding/programming in the Programming & Reversing Discussion area at GameKiller.net

  1. SoraAmm1

    SoraAmm1 The New Guy

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    9 places where you can Learn Coding for free


    Hello there my friends!

    do you wonder where is a good place to learn Coding for free?
    and with your wonder, I bet you want it as:

    NOT A SCAM
    ONLINE (WITHOUT SCHOOL OR COLLEGE)
    ONLINE (IF YOU ARE NOT ABLE TO GO TO SCHOOL FOR PRIVATE REASON)
    FREE BUT ALSO HELPFUL AND COMPLETE
    ETC...

    well....I am not sure if any of those would actually help you out, because
    you are either:

    a already professional in coding
    don't have the guts to do it or learn it
    you have the negative thinking about yourself that "I can't do it"
    etc...

    But hey!!
    since you are an internet person, and you have the hope/dream of wanting to learn coding/programming, and you think about it alot that you want to actually learn it...then keep reading, cuz I will give you the information of where i am currently learning coding/programming as beginner.

    I will give you both FREE and PAID websites that will actually REALLY tach you something!
    __________________________________________________

    1. MIT open courseware
    MIT offers free course content available for you to browse through at your leisure. Choose from courses such as:

    • Introduction to Programming in Java
    • Introduction to Computer Science and Programming
    • Practical Programming in C
    __________________________________________________
    2. Code Academy

    Code Academy is a well-known first stop for those looking to begin their coding education.
    Students can choose from several different track courses, focusing on:

    • JavaScript
    • PHP
    • Python
    • jQuery
    • Ruby
    • HTML + CSS

    3. Khan Academy

    One of the original free online coding resources, Khan Academy has come a long way. With easy-to-follow course sections with step-by-step video tutorials, Khan Academy is a great place to get started with your coding career.
    ______________
    4. HTML5 Rocks

    HTML5 Rocks is a Google project, with Google pro contributors bringing you the latest updates, resource guides, and slide decks for all things HTML5.
    The language tends to be higher level, so it's probably more suited to those with some previous experience. However, ambitious newbies are still welcome.
    __________________________________
    5. Coursera

    The king of online education, Coursera offers free classes from dozens of universities across the country, with a healthy smattering of coding classes for those with the desire to learn.
    __________________________________
    6. Udemy

    Udemy offers a ton of great video courses on everything from personal improvement to computer programming. Most of the in-depth courses come with a cost, but there are often discounts and 50 percent coupons floating around the Web that can bring down prices.
    There are also plenty of free courses which are well suited for beginners. Give them a shot!
    __________________________________
    7. Udacity

    Udacity is another great source to jumpstart your coding cognition. You can pay for their guided courses, which include a personal coach to help you develop your skills and lead you in the right direction, or browse their courseware materials pro bono.
    __________________________________
    8. Google University Consortium

    If you want to learn code, why not look to the king of the internet for help? Google'sUniversity Consortium offers free courses on:

    • mobile/android development
    • web development
    • programming languages
    The materials tend to be catered for more intermediate to advanced users, although there is a smattering of content for beginners too.
    __________________________________
    9. edX

    edX offers tons of MOOCs, including courses on programming.
    Current upcoming programming classes include:

    • Programming Languages
    • Programming for Everybody (Python)
    ______________________________________

    Paid Coding Courses

    While there is a ton of free coding educational content on the Web, there are some great paid offerings as well. Paid courses are usually more comprehensive and often provide some kind of expert support that is helpful when you're stuck or have questions.

    1. Treehouse

    Treehouse helps you pick a learning track and follow through. With videos, quizzes, and challenges, there is plenty here to keep you busy. They also help teach you about freelancing and business strategies so you can make the most of your new education.
    Cost:

    • Basic: $25/month
    • Pro: $50/month (extra talks from industry pros and access to exclusive workshops).
    • Free Trial: Get started with 2 weeks free!
    _____________________________________

    2. Learn Python the Hard Way

    Learn Python the Hard Way is a popular beginner's programming packet. For a one-time fee of $30 you get videos, a PDF, and an ePub. There's a money back guarantee too, so don't be afraid to give it a shot. Still not sure? You can read the e-book version for free! Pretty sweet deal.
    _____________________________________
    3. Code Avengers

    Code Avengers provides step-by-step instructions while guiding you through 60-plus hours of courses and helping you learn with challenges and games.
    You can start the courses for free to get a feel for them, then pay $40 for levels 2 and 3.
    _____________________________________
    4. Learn to code boot camps: intensive code courses to get 'er done

    Coding boot camps are a growing trend as the unemployed seek to make themselves more valuable in a difficult economy, and as companies look to expand the skills of their employees.Want to become a coding ninja ASAP? You might want to consider one of the increasingly popular "coding boot camps." These real-world courses are intensive two- to three-month training camps in which students are immersed in the world of code.
    Some popular coding camps include:

    • Fullstack Academy
    • Flatiron School
    • App Academy
    • General Assembly
    • Startup Institute


    IF THIS THREAT WAS HELPFUL, PLEASE LEAVE A "THANKS"

    SO GO ON AND START LEANING SOMETHING ABOUT CODING, STEP BY STEP YOU WILL BECOME A PRO DEPENDING ON YOUR EFFORTS...GOOD LUCK, AND ENJOY!!
     
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  2. Db4206910

    Db4206910 Informed Hacker

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    which is the best to start learning c++ for free
     
  3. Kleptomaniac

    Kleptomaniac Premium Premium Member

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    Code academy is pretty good my university used a bit of their stuff for their intro to com sci course
     
  4. cutandkick

    cutandkick Lurker

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    Google and online classes for the basics.
     
  5. ZacharyD

    ZacharyD The New Guy

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    Seriously awesome resources here. I work professionally as a web developer, focusing in PHP and Python. The first week of any of our interns is focused on CodeAcademy. I think it's great because the user can see the code compiled immediately, and they get encouraged. I've heard of most of these resources, but i'm fascinated by Google University Consortium, will definitely check it out.
     
  6. Darkeduar

    Darkeduar The New Guy

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    I can tell that books are very usefull too. If you can, find yourself a copy of Symphony of C++ and then just try to write something with this book and stack overflow :P that's how i got into programming :)
     
  7. icecalltt

    icecalltt The New Guy

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    cool, I really should look into this for school
     
  8. tkddnr

    tkddnr Lurker

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    thanks for your tips i was really getting myself into codings
     
  9. n131

    n131 Premium Premium Member

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    Where should someone like me start? I want to get into making programs, not sure what kind but still. I'm up for buying books, ECT. Always wanted to learn.

    I took computer tech in high school but it was a self taught course so we where handed a paper and told to do it in the next day or 2. They shut that course down as there was no teaching involved.

    They also made us do things in qbasic, then started into Visual Basic, but the visual basic we didn't learn anything . I want to LEARN and remember stuff so when I'm coding I'm not just copy and pasting.

    Any help here guys ?
     
  10. afmj

    afmj Lurker

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    Start with Python then, after you feel comfortable with it, move onto something more low-level (compiled language) like C or C++.

    Python readings: Learn Python the Hard Way, Think Python, Python 101, python.org documentation.

    C: C Primer, 21st Century C, can Google other resources.
     
  11. Koodiluola

    Koodiluola The New Guy

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    Theres a python sale on Humble Book Bundle right now. You should check it out.
     
  12. Nietzsche

    Nietzsche Боже, форум храни!

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    Or... don't fool yourself into thinking that you're really going to learn a language without a set structure and go take a community college Intro to Programming class.

    I went from zero to being able to solve systems of differential equations for heating and cooling chemical reactors in the span of a semester with a university Into to MATLAB class; with the skill set I developed from taking an actual class, I translated the knowledge I gained over to Python.

    Alternatively, get an Arduino board, get an LED, and make the LED blink on and off.
    Then make the LED ramp up and then down.
    Then make the LED blink in Morse code.
    Then grab a $0.95 photoresistor and make the LED blink when there's five pieces of paper over the photoresistor.
    Then make a PID controller with the photoresistor (adjusting the brightness of the LED).
    Then grab a TMP36 and have the brightness of the LED directly correlate with the temperature and have the board write the temperature of the room via serial to a computer; this is similar to a control system I have right now for a reaction vessel.
    BONUS: do the last two without PWM, instead using an op amp.
     

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